Skip to main content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.
Gerald R. Sherratt Library

 

library-history_brands-01: Home

History of the Library: Garden of Symbols

Southern Utah Brands (part 1)


The brands represented panel 8 were once, or are currently, used on cattle, sheep or horses in southern Utah. A brand is the key to ownership in the livestock business where ownership is everything. Brands are read from left to right, top to bottom, or from outside to inside. They may be pictorial or geometric symbols, letters, numbers or variations. Brands can be monograms, phonograms (symbolic equivalents of an individual's name), pictographs, or a word story (using an entire word). 

Branding was an ancient practice that can be traced to early depictions in 4,000-year old Egyptian tomb paintings. Hernando Cortes burned crosses in the small herd of cattle he brought with him to Mexico, and the vaqueros passed the custom on to U.S. cowboys who developed and refined their own calligraphy by burning or painting on the livestock. 


The earliest branding paint for the sheep was made from lampblack, linseed oil and flour. Woolen mills operating today insist the paint used in the branding process of sheep be a type that is easily scoured from the wool. Modern livestock owners now use a painless technique called "freeze branding" on cattle or horses. In this process the hair on the animal is shaved and liquid nitrogen is used to cool the branding iron prior to application. The hair grows back white, leaving a nice brand. 

 

John D. Day / Rockin'd Ranch

John D. Day / Rockin'd Ranch

Registered in 1969, the "Rockin'd Ranch" brand graces the left hip and left thigh of cattle and horses owned by John D. Day. The cattle bred and raised by Mr. Day have been both registered Texas Longhorn and commercial cattle. His registered American Quarter Horses have won state, regional, national and world championships. Rockin'd Ranch livestock have been used in the television and movie industry, where Mr. Day has participated as a wrangler, stunt man and actor. As the first United States Wilderness Ranger in the Pine Valley Mountain Wilderness he also uses his horses in a law enforcement capacity.

Harl E. Judd

Harl E. Judd

G. Elmer Judd registered the "JUD" Judd brand in 1940. Since 1950 the brand has been registered to his son Harl E. Judd. The family owned Hereford cattle were grazed in Cottonwood Canyon west of Kanab, in the Lost Spring Gap Allotment southeast of Kanab and in Arizona at Wahweap allotment by Glen Canyon near the present location of Lake Powell.

Behunin Family

Behunin Family

The Behunin Family brand is placed here in memory of Franklin Behunin (1966 to 1993), born a cowboy and who loved the ranching lifestyle. The "Backwards F-B" brand was originally registered to Frank's namesake, his grandfather, who used the brand on cattle and horses. At the age of 16, Frank worked on the Arizona Strip as an entertainer and wrangler and later worked as a professional guide who broke and trained horses. After a work-related snowmobile accident left him paralyzed, Frank had a special saddle made so he could still ride horses.

Warren Don Bulloch / Bruce N. Bulloch

Warren Don Bulloch / Bruce N. Bulloch

Dating back to the early 1900's, the Bulloch brand was placed on the center back of sheep and the left hip on horses and cattle. This brand is known as the "Frying Pan" brand for its close resemblance to that utensil. Brands were chosen for the simple lines, so the brand would come out clear and the owners could identify their animals at a distance. Warren H. Bulloch, son of David Dunn Bulloch, used the brand in his livestock business until approximately 1940. The Bullochs ran approximately 4,000 sheep at the peak of the family livestock business. The brand has remained in the family and is still registered to the family.

D.L. Sargent Family

D.L. Sargent Family

David LeRoy Sargent began his career at Southern Utah University in 1920 as the Head of the Agricultural Department. In 1924 in order to provide supplemental income for his growing family, Mr. Sargent purchased a 100-acre farm north of Cedar City. It became the first retail dairy business in Cedar City. Widely known as the D. L. Sargent Dairy, the "DL" brand was placed on the left side of the animal and used on dairy cows, sheep, horses and cattle. The "DL" brand was actively used until the death of Mr. Sargent in 1968.

McRae N. Bulloch

McRae N. Bulloch

The "Spear Head" sheep and cattle brand used by the McRae N. Bulloch family originated over 100 years ago with McRae's father, David C. (Cattle) Bulloch. Hundreds of cattle were branded and grazed family land owned by David C.'s father, David Dunn Bulloch, located at Pipe Springs, Arizona. The Spear Head brand was used by David C. to distinguish his cattle from those owned by his father. The brand was registered in Utah, Arizona and Nevada and is currently being used by the family for livestock. The Bulloch family is proud of their heritage and lengthy affiliation with the livestock business.

Francis H. Middleton Family

Francis H. Middleton Family

John Middleton moved to Iron County in 1856 as a 16-year old English boy and shortly after, relocated at Hamilton Fort where he was one of the first settlers to that area. John became a successful rancher, and was greatly admired by his grandson, Francis Holland Middleton. Francis adopted a variation of his grandfather's cattle brand and placed on the left shoulder of his cattle. The "Bar 7 Bar" was used by Francis from the early 1920's and is still being used today by his sons and grandsons.

Schmutz Family

Schmutz Family

The Schmutz family cattle brand has been in continuous use since 1889. Used on the left hip, the brand was designed by Gottlieb Schmutz. In 1939 Gottlieb transferred the brand to his son, Eldon Lyman Schmutz who transferred it to his son Eldon William Schmutz in 1977. The brand is currently registered to the Schmutz family corporation where it is used on Hereford range cows. The cattle range an area from Iron Springs in Iron County to Pintura in Washington County.

Alma Evans Family

Alma Evans Family

The Alma Evans Family brand originated with Alma's father, John Arthur Evans, nearly 100 years ago. The first line in the "A" curves upwards to signify the "J" for John while the"A" depicts Arthur and the "E" stands for Evans. The sheep operation ran in the western deserts and Lost Springs area for grazing, and the Chipman Peaks country in the Minersville hills, where the lambing corrals were located. In the 1920's the operation included some 5,000 sheep. Alma and his brother Arthur were in the livestock trucking business for a number of years and ran up to 1,600 cattle at the peak of their partnership in the late 1980's. The brand is currently used by Alma Evans and his sons in their cattle operation.

National Mustang Association

National Mustang Association
The National Mustang Association (NMA) was founded in 1970 to preserve and protect wild and free roaming horses. A sanctuary was established to provide a home for unadoptable horses removed from public lands. In 1966 over 70 head of horses were grazing on the NAM ranch and allotment. The "NMA" brand is necessary to identify those horses under its protection.

McKeon Land and Cattle

McKeon Land and Cattle
Fascinated by the lore of the Old West and the infamous 1881 gun battle at the OK Corral in Tombstone, Arizona, P.B. McKeon adopted the "OK" brand for his livestock. Originally from Pennsylvania, P.B. married Mary A. Smithson and was one of the first settlers to the Milford Valley. The brand was used on horses during 1902 and 1903 when the family drove 1,500 horses in two herds from Milford, Utah to Los Angeles, California. The third generation to use the brand was P.B.'s grandson, Jack B. McKeon. Fourth and Fifth generation McKeon family members still used the brand today for 2,500 family-owned cattle on feed in southern Utah.

Steve and Cyndi Gilbert


Steve and Cyndi Gilbert
The "Diamond G" brand came into existence in 1989 after Steve and Cyndi Gilbert purchased the famous bull, Ricky, at the National Finals Rodeo Bucking Horse and Bull Sale. The Gilberts have created the "Diamond G" Ranch where Ricky remains the primary stud bull for rodeo breeding purposes. He is a cross between the Charolais and Brahma breeds. The brand is used on all the livestock of the "Diamond G" Rodeo companies that are part of the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association.

Tom Williams

Tom Williams
This brand was originally used by John Lundell before he left the sheep business. Lundell was one of three Swedes who came to southern Utah around the turn of the century to find work and ended up sheep ranching. The Williams family traces its Utah roots to 1878 when Evan E. Williams came from Wales at the age of nine. Around 1920 Evan went into the sheep business and adopted the brand. He was a member of the Mercantile Cooperative until its dissolution in the 1920s. His son, Alex, bought him out in 1941 and started using the "Open Box" brand. Alex's son Tom now uses the brand on his herd of 2,800 sheep.

Philip and Emily H. Foremaster

Philip and Emily H. Foremaster
Philip and Emily H. Foremaster have grazed cattle on the Arizona Strip for over 55 years. The family inherited their love of ranching and the great outdoors from Philip's parents, Ephraim and Ida L. Foremaster. Ephraim and his sons Joe, Philip, Lindau, and Tone have had a successful family owned livestock business on the Strip spanning over 100 years. Placed on the left hip, the "Slash Lazy E" brand used by Philip is a variation of his father's brand, which was a "Block E." Philip, with the help of his children, continued to work with his cattle until the age of 90. The "Slash Lazy E" brand is now owned by his son and daughter-in-law, Howard and Annette Foremaster.

T.W. Jones and Sons

T.W. Jones and Sons
Born in Cedar City a son of early settler Lehi W. Jones, Thomas Willard Jones received an engineering degree from the University of Utah and was one of the owners of the New Castle Reclamation Company. Willard and his wife, Sophia Forsyth Jones, made their home in the western Iron County where Willard was one of the original agricultural developers of the area. Willard operated the family cattle business with his two sons Richard and Uriah. The "Wrench" brand was chosen in 1917 for the ease in forming and applying the brand due to its straight lines and less complicated form. The design is still in used today by Richard Jones, his sons Mason and Steven and their sons Mark, Chris, Eric, and David.

Continue with more in Garden of Symbols: Brands (pt. 2)